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If you’ve got questions about your spinal condition, or not sure whether or not you need to speak to a spine specialist, you can just call Proliance Spine to speak to someone and find out.  No obligations, no commitments.  Just a friendly voice who can help you make an informed decision.

Get to know Proliance Spine

Proliance Spine is a group of more than 20 outpatient spine centers in Washington, with locations from Bellingham to Olympia.  What’s unique about Proliance Spine is that we specialize in spine treatment.  From physiatry to minimally invasive surgery, every medical professional across all our centers is a spine pro.

Proliance Spine Institute

Proliance Spine is a division of Proliance Surgeons, one of the largest surgical practices in the country, with more than 425 providers including over 250 board-certified physicians providing treatment at more than 100 care centers in Washington State. Proliance Surgeons range of specialties includes orthopedics, sports medicine, ear nose & throat, general surgery, ophthalmology, obstetrics & gynecology, urology and more.

Proliance Spine is a division of Proliance Surgeons, one of the largest surgical practices in the country.
Proliance Spine is a division of Proliance Surgeons, one of the largest surgical practices in the country.

The Hospital Alternative

At Proliance Spine, we like to refer to our centers as “The Hospital Alternative.”  Even though you’ll still get top-level surgical care, it’s the important things that make the real differences.

CARE
As you know, the care at Proliance Spine is laser-focused on spine care.  From diagnosis to treatment to therapy, we’re happy to say we’re “all spine, all the time.”  But unlike a hospital, where you may never meet your surgeon until you’re in the operating room, Proliance Spine sets up a care structure where you and your surgeon and your physiatrist are crafting the perfect plan for your spinal treatment.

CONVENIENCE
When it comes to taking care of your spine, Proliance Spine puts a premium on convenience – we want to make it as easy and comfortable for you as possible to take care of whatever condition you may have.  That’s why we have so many locations – from Bellingham to Olympia, chances are there’s a Proliance Spine not too far from where you live.  And since we’re not a hospital, you’ll never be fighting crowds of sick people to get to your appointment – you’ll get the care you need in a setting that’s calm, comfortable, and friendly.

COST
What most people don’t realize is that the costs in an outpatient setting are typically LESS than what you’ll pay at a hospital.  And in most cases, you won’t be staying overnight, so that keeps your costs in line too.  The best part:  we’ll talk to you about all of that upfront – no surprise bills or added fees to your discharge paperwork.

INSURANCE 
Proliance Spine accepts most major insurance from the primary insurance regions in the state of Washington.  Almost all procedures are partially or fully covered.  In some limited cases, all or part of a specific procedure may not be covered by your insurance plan, but be sure to contact us to clarify what the details are.  We work hard to find the right procedures for your condition, and the right authorizations with your insurance provider.  Some of the more well-known insurance carriers that cover Proliance Spine procedures:

  • Molina Healthcare of Washington
  • Premera Blue Cross
  • Regence Blue Shield
  • P & L (Labor & Industries of Washington State)
  • Commercial Plans
  • Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington
  • Medicare Plans
  • Medicaid Plans

Remember, some other insurance providers may provide coverage as well, so be sure to contact Proliance Spine to confirm if your carrier is included.

Proliance Spine Institute

PROLIANCE SPINE INFORMATION

We treat many different types of diseases and spinal conditions at Proliance Spine, so don’t hesitate to call us if you’re experiencing leg or back pain, neck pain or radiating pain down your shoulders or arms. These may all be signs of serious spine problems and it’s better to address them sooner than later.

Some of the  more common diseases & conditions treated at Proliance Spine:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Spinal Stenosis
  • Degenerative Disc Disease
  • Disc Herniation
  • Osteophytes or Osteoporosis
  • Myelopathy
  • Scoliosis
  • Kyphosis

Proliance Spine offers many non-surgical interventions to help you get the best treatment for your condition and get you back to a normal life.

ESI
In some cases, especially if it’s early in the process and you’re just starting to experience symptoms, you may come to Proliance Spine for non-surgical intervention. This might include physical therapy designed by one of our physiatrists, or in more severe cases, it might mean receiving ESI, which stands for epidural steroid injections. These are injections that deliver medicine directly to affected areas in your spine, and in some cases, can relieve pain for weeks or even months.

Physiatry
Most Proliance Spine centers also have physiatrists on staff. These medical doctors have a specialized understanding of spinal conditions and will work with patients in a number of ways. In some cases, if a patient does not need surgery, the physiatrist will design the therapeutic exercise program to help with pain or weakness. In cases where a patient does need surgery, the physiatrist will work with the patient (depending on the surgery performed,) to recover and regain optimum function so they can get back to a normal lifestyle.

Decompression
Generally, decompression refers to any surgical procedure that involves relieving the pressure being placed on spinal nerves by offending anatomy, such as arthritis, disc deformation or osteophytes, (otherwise known as bone spurs.)

Discectomy, Microdiscectomy or Microdecompression
Typically a minimally invasive procedure where a portion of the intervertebral disc is removed and/or repaired. Bulging, herniated, or degenerative disc problems are addressed with these procedures, and sometimes accompanied with additional measures, such as spinal fusion.

Laminotomy and Laminectomy
Two types of decompression surgery, both laminotomy and laminectomy are surgical procedures on the lamina, a part of the vertebral body. Laminotomy is less invasive, in that it typically is the removal of relatively little parts of the bone. A Laminectomy is usually a more significant procedure, as it involves significant trimming or even removal (resection) of the lamina.

Foraminotomy and Foraminectomy
Also a kind of decompression, foraminotomy and foraminectomy are surgical procedures on the foramen. The foramen is actually an opening along the side of the vertebral bone, where spinal nerves exit the spine and travel to other parts of the body. When the foramen gets overcrowded by some other part of the anatomy (herniated or bulging disc or bone growth,) it closes on the nerve and causes pain.

coflex®
In some cases following a decompression of the lumbar region, the surgeon may opt to stabilize with a coflex® device. This is a small u-shaped titanium implant that gets inserted between the vertebrae to provide stability and to maintain a healthy height in the intervertebral space. It’s not for everyone, but for those patients who are candidates, it’s an alternative that offers lasting pain relief with a relatively short recovery period. Most coflex® patients are up and walking the next day and can return to normal activity after their surgical wound has healed.

Spinal Fusion
In some cases following a decompression, the amount of bone removal or the amount of disease may leave the spine unstable, and a procedure called spinal fusion must be performed. In this procedure, the disc is removed and the surgeon joins two vertebrae together using a bone graft from another part of your body (usually the hip) or a synthetic material. The bones are held together using rods and screws.  The recovery is typically longer than other procedures because it takes time for the bones to “fuse” together.

PROLIANCE SPINE INFORMATION

We treat many different types of diseases and spinal conditions at Proliance Spine, so don’t hesitate to call us if you’re experiencing leg or back pain, neck pain or radiating pain down your shoulders or arms. These may all be signs of serious spine problems and it’s better to address them sooner than later.

Some of the  more common diseases & conditions treated at Proliance Spine:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Spinal Stenosis
  • Degenerative Disc Disease
  • Disc Herniation
  • Osteophytes or Osteoporosis
  • Myelopathy
  • Scoliosis
  • Kyphosis

Proliance Spine offers many non-surgical interventions to help you get the best treatment for your condition and get you back to a normal life.

ESI
In some cases, especially if it’s early in the process and you’re just starting to experience symptoms, you may come to Proliance Spine for non-surgical intervention. This might include physical therapy designed by one of our physiatrists, or in more severe cases, it might mean receiving ESI, which stands for epidural steroid injections. These are injections that deliver medicine directly to affected areas in your spine, and in some cases, can relieve pain for weeks or even months.

Physiatry
Most Proliance Spine centers also have physiatrists on staff. These medical doctors have a specialized understanding of spinal conditions and will work with patients in a number of ways. In some cases, if a patient does not need surgery, the physiatrist will design the therapeutic exercise program to help with pain or weakness. In cases where a patient does need surgery, the physiatrist will work with the patient (depending on the surgery performed,) to recover and regain optimum function so they can get back to a normal lifestyle.

Decompression
Generally, decompression refers to any surgical procedure that involves relieving the pressure being placed on spinal nerves by offending anatomy, such as arthritis, disc deformation or osteophytes, (otherwise known as bone spurs.)

Discectomy, Microdiscectomy or Microdecompression
Typically a minimally invasive procedure where a portion of the intervertebral disc is removed and/or repaired. Bulging, herniated, or degenerative disc problems are addressed with these procedures, and sometimes accompanied with additional measures, such as spinal fusion.

Laminotomy and Laminectomy
Two types of decompression surgery, both laminotomy and laminectomy are surgical procedures on the lamina, a part of the vertebral body. Laminotomy is less invasive, in that it typically is the removal of relatively little parts of the bone. A Laminectomy is usually a more significant procedure, as it involves significant trimming or even removal (resection) of the lamina.

Foraminotomy and Foraminectomy
Also a kind of decompression, foraminotomy and foraminectomy are surgical procedures on the foramen. The foramen is actually an opening along the side of the vertebral bone, where spinal nerves exit the spine and travel to other parts of the body. When the foramen gets overcrowded by some other part of the anatomy (herniated or bulging disc or bone growth,) it closes on the nerve and causes pain.

coflex®
In some cases following a decompression of the lumbar region, the surgeon may opt to stabilize with a coflex® device. This is a small u-shaped titanium implant that gets inserted between the vertebrae to provide stability and to maintain a healthy height in the intervertebral space. It’s not for everyone, but for those patients who are candidates, it’s an alternative that offers lasting pain relief with a relatively short recovery period. Most coflex® patients are up and walking the next day and can return to normal activity after their surgical wound has healed.

Spinal Fusion
In some cases following a decompression, the amount of bone removal or the amount of disease may leave the spine unstable, and a procedure called spinal fusion must be performed. In this procedure, the disc is removed and the surgeon joins two vertebrae together using a bone graft from another part of your body (usually the hip) or a synthetic material. The bones are held together using rods and screws.  The recovery is typically longer than other procedures because it takes time for the bones to “fuse” together.

Contact Proliance Spine Today
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